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Version 1
18. August 2017.
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by World Health Organization, 14. August, 2017

Potable reuse: Guidance for producing safe drinking-water

by World Health Organization, 14. August, 2017

In response to growing pressures on available water resources, potable reuse represents a practical source of drinking-water in many circumstances.

This document describes how to apply appropriate management systems to produce safe drinking-water from municipal wastewater. Information is provided on specific aspects of potable reuse, including the quality and protection of source wastewaters, types of control measures, monitoring considerations and public acceptance. Application of potable reuse is also illustrated through a number of case studies.

The guidance is intended for use by drinking-water suppliers and regulators who are familiar with the WHO’s Guidelines for drinking-water quality and, in particular, the framework for safe drinking-water, including water safety plans. This publication may also be useful to others with an interest in potable reuse including environmental health and water resource professionals.

Version 1
11. August 2017.
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by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

A role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in Water Safety Plans

by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

One of the challenges in the implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs) is stakeholder engagement. For this reason, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education has developed a role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in WSP. The game can be used in WSP training or during educational activities for water safety and WSP at graduate and post-graduate level. Its goal is for participants to experience the importance of stakeholder engagement in WSPs, and particularly in the decision-making process when investing in the rehabilitation and maintenance of a drinking water supply system from catchment to consumers. Participants will experience how this process can be influenced by information exchange between stakeholders and how this will eventually lead to greater awareness when assembling the WSP team.

Version 1
8. August 2017.
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by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

Developing drinking water safety plans

by EPA Ireland, 08. February, 2011

This document provides guidance to water suppliers on the steps involved in developing a water safety plan and an outline of what it should contain in the Irish context. It contains guidance and useful templates on hazard identification, risk assessment and the preparation of action plans for the hazards identified.

Version 1
31. July 2017.
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by WECF International, 30. June, 2017

WSSP compendium – Developing a water & sanitation safety plan in a rural community

by WECF International, 30. June, 2017

A Water and Sanitation Safety Plan (WSSP) is an efficient methodology to manage drinking water and sanitation safely and is based on the Water Safety Plan and Sanitation Safety Plan approach by WHO. This WSSP Compendium aims to enable communities to develop a WSSP for small-scale water supplies, e.g. dug wells, boreholes, springs and piped centralised water supply systems, and as well as to assess the quality of sanitation facilities such as school toilets.

Version 1
11. July 2017.
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by Karen Setty et al., 01. May, 2017

Water quality, compliance, and health outcomes among utilities implementing Water Safety Plans in France and Spain

by Karen Setty et al., 01. May, 2017

Water Safety Plans (WSPs), recommended by the World Health Organization since 2004, seek to proactively identify potential risks to drinking water supplies and implement preventive barriers that improve safety. To evaluate the outcomes of WSP application in large drinking water systems in France and Spain, we undertook analysis of water quality and compliance indicators between 2003 and 2015, in conjunction with an observational retrospective cohort study of acute gastroenteritis incidence, before and after WSPs were implemented at five locations. Measured water quality indicators included bacteria (E. coli, fecal streptococci, total coliform, heterotrophic plate count), disinfectants (residual free and total chlorine), disinfection by-products (trihalomethanes, bromate), aluminum, pH, turbidity, and total organic carbon, comprising about 240K manual samples and 1.2M automated sensor readings. We used multiple, Poisson, or Tobit regression models to evaluate water quality before and after the WSP intervention. The compliance assessment analyzed exceedances of regulated, recommended, or operational water quality thresholds using chi-squared or Fisher’s exact tests. Poisson regression was used to examine acute gastroenteritis incidence rates in WSP-affected drinking water service areas relative to a comparison area. Implementation of a WSP generally resulted in unchanged or improved water quality, while compliance improved at most locations. Evidence for reduced acute gastroenteritis incidence following WSP implementation was found at only one of the three locations examined. Outcomes of WSPs should be expected to vary across large water utilities in developed nations, as the intervention itself is adapted to the needs of each location. The approach may translate to diverse water quality, compliance, and health outcomes.
(Final report at https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijheh.2017.02.004)

Version 1
30. June 2017.
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by Hallvard Ødegaard et al., 30. June, 2014

Microbial barrier analysis (MBA) – a guideline

by Hallvard Ødegaard et al., 30. June, 2014

In order to safeguard the public against waterborne diseases, water utilities must secure that multiple, microbial barriers are provided for in their drinking water systems. In most water utilities disinfection of the water represents an important barrier, but microbial barriers may also be achieved by other actions, for example in the catchment area.

Based on experiences from Norway, Sweden and Finland, this guideline is a helpful tool for implementing Water Safety Plans. The guideline explains the "barrier concept" and assist water utilities as well as their their consultants in determining what actions to take to ensure that the microbial barriers in their systems are sufficient – and that the water is safe to drink.

Version 1
22. June 2017.
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by ADB et al., 31. May, 2017

Water safety planning for urban water utilities: Practical guide for ADB staff

by ADB et al., 31. May, 2017

This handbook provides practical guidance on integrating the water safety plan (WSP) approach into ADB's urban water projects to facilitate compliance with global good practices. Following the WHO’s Water Safety Plan Manual (2009), adapted to ADB’s operations, this handbook offers step-by-step guidance on developing and implementing a WSP, serving as an example of how external support agencies may integrate WSPs into their urban water programmes.

Version 1
21. June 2017.
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by World Health Organization, 13. June, 2017

Global status report on water safety plans: A review of proactive risk assessment and risk management practices to ensure the safety of drinking-water

by World Health Organization, 13. June, 2017

Based on information gathered from 118 countries representing every region of the globe, this report provides a picture of WSP uptake worldwide. It presents information on WSP implementation and the integration of WSPs into the policy environment. It also explores WSP benefits, challenges and future priorities.

It is envisaged that this report will serve as a useful resource for policy-makers, practitioners and other stakeholders to inform and strengthen the planning and practice of WSP implementation.

Version 0
29. May 2017.
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by Mahmoud Abd Al Rahman Saad Mehany et al., 2016

WSP Status in Egypt

by Mahmoud Abd Al Rahman Saad Mehany et al., 2016

Egypt has accomplished the first draft of WSP at 2013, via cooperation between the Holding Company for Water and Wastewater and the VNG - International, this abstract represent the current situation of WSP in Egypt.

Version 1
26. May 2017.
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by Rory Moses McKeown, 26. May, 2017

WSP template for rural water supplies in Liberia

by Rory Moses McKeown, 26. May, 2017

This WSP template as been developed and customized specifically for use in rural water supplies in Liberia. Text in yellow provides an example of how to complete each section. This template may be considered for use in other countries and regions, but must first be reviewed and adapted to suit the local context.

Version 1
26. May 2017.
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by Rory Moses McKeown, 26. May, 2017

WSP template for organized water supplies in Liberia

by Rory Moses McKeown, 26. May, 2017

This WSP template as been developed and customized specifically for use in organized (i.e. urban) water supplies in Liberia. Text in yellow provides an example of how to complete each section. This template may be considered for use in other countries and regions, but must first be reviewed and adapted to suit the local context.

Version 1
20. March 2017.
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by World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe et al.,

Taking policy action to improve small-scale water supply and sanitation systems. Tools and good practices from the pan-European Region

by World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe et al.,

Presents policy-makers with a range of regulatory, planning, financial and educational instruments to support effective policy and promote good practice (including water safety planning) to improve small-scale water supply and sanitation systems.

This publication aims to inspire practitioners and policy-makers who develop water supply and sanitation policies and programmes at the national or subnational levels to consider improvement actions that they can adapt for their own circumstances. It further assists policy-makers in formulating specific targets for small-scale systems and in planning concrete actions for their achievement. Other stakeholders – such as aid and funding agencies, local governments and nongovernmental organizations – may also find the information relevant for their programmes and projects.