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Version 1
11. May 2016.
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by WHO/IWA, 2010

Être ambitieux, s’engager prudemment, puis élargir le champ d’action

by WHO/IWA, 2010

Dans le cadre des efforts continus en faveur de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau de boisson et de la santé, de nombreux pays ont demandé des orientations concernant la façon d’introduire des plans de gestion de la sécurité sanitaire de l’eau (PGSSE) et d’élargir leur mise en oeuvre. Il n’existe ni modèle ni façon unique de procéder en la matière.
Néanmoins, en se fondant sur l’expérience, une succession d’étapes décrivant comment y parvenir a été définie. Cette « feuille de route » relative aux PGSSE est destinée aux gouvernements et aux autorités chargés de concevoir ou de réviser les réglementations, programmes, et politiques relatifs à l’eau de boisson. Elle peut également se révéler utile pour les distributeurs d’eau et les autres organisations intéressées par l’amélioration des pratiques existantes.

Version 1
1. December 2008.
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by Bob Breach , 01. December, 2008

Rapid gravity filters-water quality benefits and risks

by Bob Breach , 01. December, 2008

Rapid gravity filters are used extensively in many waterworks across the world where they provide a critical part of the water purification process. This document summarises the basic functions and operation of such filters and identifies possible risks to water quality which need to be assessed and managed as part of a treatment water safety plan.

Version 1
1. February 2011.
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by CDC, 01. February, 2011

A Conceptual Framework to Evaluate the Impacts of Water Safety Plans

by CDC, 01. February, 2011

This paper outlines a conceptual framework for conducting this type of overall evaluation of the impacts of a WSP. Drawing examples from existing WSPs in various regions, the framework also illustrates the types of intermediate outcomes that can be expected during WSP implementation. This conceptual framework, which requires some familiarity with WSPs, is designed to be one of a set of tools to guide the implementation and evaluation of Water Safety Plans, along with the WHO guidelines (WHO, 2006), the Water Safety Plan Manual (Bartram et al, 2009) and other tools and resources developed for national or regional use1

Version 1
20. March 2011.
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by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Water safety in buildings

by World Health Organization, 07. March, 2011

Provides guidance for those responsible for managing water supply systems in buildings on applying the WSP approach to improve risk management and ensure water safety is maintained within the building.

This document provides guidance for managing water supplies in buildings where people may drink water; use water for food preparation; wash, shower, swim or use water for other recreational activities; or be exposed to aerosols produced by water-using devices, such as cooling towers. These uses occur in a variety of buildings, such as hospitals, schools, child and aged care, medical and dental facilities, hotels, apartment blocks, sport centres, commercial buildings and transport terminals.

Version 1
1. November 2008.
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by Bob Breach , 01. November, 2008

WSP summary of benefits and costs

by Bob Breach , 01. November, 2008

Before implementation of a WSP it is important to clearly identify the expected benefits and the associated costs both of which could be significant. This will help secure the support of senior management, ensure that sufficient resources are made available and allow much more targeted and efficient implementation. The actual benefits and costs of WSP implementation will vary considerably from utility to utility. This document sets out a summary of the issues that need to be taken into account.

Version 1
2. March 2008.
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by US Department of Health and Human Services et al., 02. March, 2008

A guide to conducting household surveys for Water Safety Plans

by US Department of Health and Human Services et al., 02. March, 2008

The aim of this manual is to provide guidance on conducting a household survey as part of a Water Safety Plan for organized piped water supply systems in resource-limited settings. A household survey can help researchers to understand the fate of water from the time it reaches the home to the point of consumption. This survey contributes to Module 2 (System Assessment) of the Water Safety Plan, upon which the subsequent steps of hazard identification, consideration of control measures, and development of corrective actions, monitoring, and verification plans are based. Thus, the survey provides valuable information for the WSP team as the team goes through the process of system evaluation and implementation of changes resulting from the Water Safety Plan. Specific examples intended to guide the planner in designing the survey are provided in the appendices. A summary checklist for survey planning and completion is provided as Appendix A.