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Version 1
4. November 2016.
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by South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO , 27. April, 2016

Capacity Training on Urban Water Safety Planning – Training Modules

by South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO , 27. April, 2016

These training materials have been developed by the South-East Asia Regional Office of WHO to be used either to train trainers or to train operators of water supply utilities or sector stakeholders. They are intended for use by governments, NGOs, private sector, academic institutions and individuals. They may be used intensively over three or five days or included in longer educational programs either as part of academic courses or as part of continuing professional development training. They comprise:
- Presenters Guide,
- Participant’s Handbook,
- PowerPoint slides notes for presenter and PowerPoint Handouts for participants,
- Worksheets and other resources for participants
- Table group worksheets for use during the training programme.

 

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2014

Water safety plan: a field guide to improving drinking-water safety in small communities – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2014

This field guide provides a step-by-step introduction to the WSP approach and a range of ready-to-use templates to assist those locally involved in rural water supply to develop and implement their own WSPs.
The field guide particularly addresses the rural community members responsible for the operation and management of their water supplies, as well as the staff of the local health and water supply offices responsible for safeguarding drinking-water quality and nongovernmental organizations that support drinking-water safety in rural communities.

Version 1
28. February 2017.
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by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

CLIMATE RESILIENT WATER SAFETY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION – Guidelines for Urban Utility Managed Drinking Water Supplies

by Ministry of Water Irrigation and Energy Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia, 01. July, 2015

The purpose of these Ethiopian guidelines is to provide step-by-step guidance to the operators and managers of the large, medium and small urban water supplies with conventional water treatment systems on how to develop, implement, monitor, and review the water safety plans aimed at protecting human health. Furthermore, it serves as practical tool in identifying and addressing priority risks to the water quality and quantity, reliability and sustainability of the water supply system  including risks related to current and future impacts of climate changes by taking into consideration available resources and capacities of the water supply system.

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11. August 2017.
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by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

A role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in Water Safety Plans

by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 17. July, 2017

One of the challenges in the implementation of Water Safety Plans (WSPs) is stakeholder engagement. For this reason, IHE Delft Institute for Water Education has developed a role-playing game for practising stakeholder collaboration in WSP. The game can be used in WSP training or during educational activities for water safety and WSP at graduate and post-graduate level. Its goal is for participants to experience the importance of stakeholder engagement in WSPs, and particularly in the decision-making process when investing in the rehabilitation and maintenance of a drinking water supply system from catchment to consumers. Participants will experience how this process can be influenced by information exchange between stakeholders and how this will eventually lead to greater awareness when assembling the WSP team.

Version 1
13. April 2018.
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by Water Supplies Department et al., 02. April, 2018

Water safety plan template for residential care homes for the elderly

by Water Supplies Department et al., 02. April, 2018

This template is prepared based on recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO)  to assist the owner or the house management staff of a residential care home for the elderly with an independent internal plumbing system to develop and implement a Water Safety Plan (WSP) to enhance water safety.

Version 1
26. July 2018.
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by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

Training Package on Climate Resilient Water Safety Plan (CR-WSP)

by Government of Nepal et al., 02. October, 2017

This training toolkit aims to support  roll-out of climate resilient WSPs in Nepal by capacitating national trainers. The training materials are based on international (WHO) and national (Department of Water Supply & Sanitation) best practices and experiences.

The training toolkit contains a “Facilitators handbook”, “Participants workbook” and presentations, to support the successful and consistent delivery of the national climate resilient WSP training program.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2010

Think big, start small, scale-up: a road map to support country level implementation of water safety plans – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2010

This document provides a 'road map' to support country-level implementation of WSPs. It provides guidance for country planners on how to initiate and carry out WSP implementation.  The document outlines a series of steps which may guide how WSP implementation and scale-up of WSPs may be approached at a national level.

Version 1
21. April 2016.
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by WHO, 2012

Water safety planning for small community water supplies – ENGLISH

by WHO, 2012

This manual is designed to engage, empower and guide communities in the WSP development and implementation process. Guidance is provided on how to develop and implement a WSP through six achievable tasks. By following the WSP approach as described in this manual, small communities can improve the management of their drinking-water systems to achieve incremental and sustainable improvements in their drinking-water quality.

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29. September 2017.
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by Water Supplies Department et al., 21. September, 2017

Guidelines for Drinking Water Safety Plans for Buildings in Hong Kong

by Water Supplies Department et al., 21. September, 2017

根據世界衛生組織(WHO)的建議,香港水務署最近編制了建築物水安全計劃的指引和範本,協助業主或物業管理代理制訂水安全計劃,以風險為本和多重障礙的方法,加強建築物的食水安全。建築物水安全計劃的實施,有賴物業管理和水喉業界人士的共同努力,包括辨識和評估內部供水系統的潛在風險,制定控制措施和執行相應的檢查和保養。此外,通過定期審核和檢視,物業管理可以驗證和更新建築物的水安全計劃。香港水務署已於2017年9月推出建築物水安全計劃的指引和分別合適一般建築物和學校使用的範本後,供建築物業主或物業管理代理自願參與。

Based on the recommendations of the World Health Organization (WHO), the Water Supplies Department (WSD) of Hong Kong has recently developed guidelines and templates for Water Safety Plan (WSP) for Buildings. The guidelines and templates aim at assisting building owners or management agents to develop their own WSPs to enhance water safety in buildings by using a risk-based and multiple barrier approach. Implementation of WSP for buildings requires concerted efforts of building management and plumbing practitioners, including identifying and assessing potential risks of the inside service, deriving control measures and carrying out the corresponding checking and maintenance. In addition, the WSP will be verified and updated by the building management through periodic auditing and review. The guidelines and templates for general buildings and schools have been launched in September 2017 for voluntary adoption by building owners or management agents.

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2. May 2018.
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by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 23. February, 2018

Experiential Learning through Role-Playing: Enhancing Stakeholder Collaboration in Water Safety Plans

by Giuliana Ferrero et al., 23. February, 2018

Improved water safety management, as addressed by the Sustainable Development Goals, can be aided by Water Safety Planning, a risk-assessment and risk-management approach introduced
by the World Health Organization and implemented to date in 93 countries around the globe. Yet, this approach still encounters some challenges in practice, including that of securing collaboration among the broad range of stakeholders involved. This paper presents a role-playing game designed to foster stakeholder collaboration in Water Safety Plans (WSP). In this role-play, participants take on different stakeholders’ roles during a collective (team-based) decision-making process to improve water supply safety in a fictive town. The game is the result of a transdisciplinary initiative aimed at integrating knowledge across technical and governance aspects of WSPs into an active learning experience for water sector actors from diverse backgrounds. It exposes participants to the four phases of Kolb’s experiential learning cycle: concrete experience, reflective observation, conceptualization and active experimentation. This paper discusses potential impacts of the WSP role-play, including skills and knowledge development among participants, which can support cross-sectoral integration and dealing with complexity in decision-making. These are capacity assets strongly needed to address water safety management challenges in a sustainable way.

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24. August 2016.
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by WHO, 2014

План обеспечения безопасности воды: практическое руководство по повышению безопасности питьевой воды в небольших местных общинах

by WHO, 2014

Снабжение приемлемой и безопасной питьевой водой в достаточном количестве является одной из основных необходимых предпосылок хорошего здоровья, экономического развития и устойчивой жизнедеятельности семей в сельских сообществах. Подход с использованием плана безопасности воды (ПБВ) является наиболее эффективным путем обеспечения питьевой водой в условиях маломасштабных систем водоснабжения.

В данных рекомендациях приводятся поэтапное описание подхода ПБВ и целый ряд готовых к использованию схем в помощь тем, кто занимается вопросами сельского водоснабжения на местном уровне, в разработке и осуществлении своих собственных ПБВ.

Рекомендации прежде всего адресованы членам сельских сообществ, отвечающих за организацию работы и управление системами водоснабжения, а также сотрудникам местных органов здравоохранения и водоснабжения, ответственных за обеспечение качества питьевой воды, и неправительственным организациям, оказывающим поддержку в области обеспечения безопасности питьевой воды в сельской местности.

Version 1
10. February 2017.
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by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

Climate Change and Health – Ethiopia – Lesson learned documentation WASH sector

by MOWIE Ethiopia, 18. October, 2016

The purpose of this document is to share Ethiopia’s experience in the implementation of the "Building adaptation to climate change in health in least developed countries through WASH project" especially the WASH sector with development partners, government bodies and project implementing member countries. It includes valuable lessons learned from development and implementation of climate-resilient water safety plans and associated policy.